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The exclusive providers of the Life Story Experience

Lois Loucks

August 4, 1922 - February 3, 2017
Wakarusa, IN

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Visitations


Tuesday, February 7, 2017
4:00 PM to 8:00 PM EST
Thompson-Lengacher & Yoder Funeral Home
501 N. Elkhart St.
Wakarusa, IN 46573

Services


Wednesday, February 8, 2017
10:30 AM EST
Thompson-Lengacher & Yoder Funeral Home
501 N. Elkhart St.
Wakarusa, IN 46573
(574) 862-4506

Life Story / Obituary


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A woman naturally centered in love, faith, and fortitude Lois Lucille Loucks lived an extraordinary life. She embraced each day as an embodiment of faith living in conscious service to others. Whether working to create a loving home where all were welcome, serving her church community, caring for the family farm, or sharing time with friends and family, Lois always lead with her heart.

A devoted and loving wife, mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother , she found pleasure living on the land she loved, welcoming life’s challenges and joys equally, and showering others with her good care. In as much as she gave, Lois was loved abundantly and cherished in the hearts of many. Though she will be sadly missed, her beautiful legacy will continue to weave cherished memories of a well-loved and admired woman.

The early 1920’s were marked by tremendous confidence, prosperity, and previously unknown comforts. The economy boomed, wages rose for most Americans and prices fell, resulting in a higher standard of living for most. With the inventions of the washing machine, vacuum cleaner, self-winding watch, bulldozer, instant camera, drive-in restaurants, Band-Aids, and the convertible the post-war, era marked significant advancement and morale flourished throughout the land. While the US census proved for the first time in history that more Americans lived in urban areas than rural ones, the wave of sweeping social and economic growth grew exponentially with the ratification of the 19th amendment which granted women the right to vote. More than a million women worked in white collar jobs while the automobile industry nearly doubled. Tremendous confidence, prosperity, and previously unknown comforts marked this roaring decade. Locally, this vibrant decade grew even brighter as Roy and Dessie (Pittman) Truex welcomed their daughter Lois into their hearts and home on August 4, 1922.

Lois’ childhood on the family farm taught her from a very early age both the value of hard work and the rewards of harvesting the bounty of one’s labors. She and her sister Bessie often reminisced the adventures they shared milking the family cow. Lois also worked long days pulling weeds in the mint fields. Like many rural families, the challenges of the Great Depression weighed heavy. Despite the rigors of farm life during such a dark time, Lois grew up in the good company of her siblings, Lowell, Don, Joan, Bessie, and Roy. Additionally, the family drew tremendous strength from their faith which they explored and celebrated through their membership in the Oak Grove Missionary Church.

As was common for the youth of her time, Lois learned a lifelong sense of perseverance through hard work that she carried into her adulthood. Not easily intimidated by a challenge, after graduation from Madison High School Lois went to work. During the war, she worked for 25 cents an hour at Ball Band making boots for soldiers. The long hours and distinctly strong smell of rubber from the job left permanent impressions on her memory.

While attending the Wakarusa town movie nights, which were held in the park on Friday and Saturday nights, Lois met her future husband, Merit Eugene Loucks. Merit chose to investigate Lois’ potential by sneaking into the kitchen to evaluate the peelings from the potatoes she’d peel for thickness. Lois’ father wisely encouraged Merit to marry her because she was a hard worker and not just because she was good looking. The couple married on August 9, 1942, in Wakarusa. Lois’ parents gave the happy couple a cow for their wedding present, while their friends gathered gas rationing coupons to send them on a honeymoon trip to Wisconsin.

The war ended while Lois and Merit were on their honeymoon adding to their hopes for a bright future. Once home, and true to her father’s assertion, Lois grew into a true farm wife. Not only was she an apt driver of the farm tractor, she ably pulled her weight by noticing what was needed and then setting about the work to get it done. The young couple built their marriage and family life on the firm foundation of their faith. Bethel Missionary Church served as their church community early in their marriage and Bible Baptist Church in Wakarusa in their later years. As a homemaker, Lois was highly organized, efficient, and productive. She enjoyed the art of creating a delicious meal for her family and made many a chocolate pie for church dinners over the years. Without question, Lois made the best butterhorns in the entire county and her canned green beans were legendary! Her home was impeccable; you could absolutely eat off her floor.

Some of Lois’ favorite memories included her travels to Arizona, Florida, and Crandon, Wisconsin where her brother-in-law Herb owned a resort. Her heart’s greatest delight was the time she spent with her grandchildren. She especially loved planning and making special meals for her family and having her grandchildren over for special nights spent just with them. She was especially pleased to use her amazing talents as a seamstress to give each grandchild a carefully created quilt she made just for them. Over the years she also enjoyed doing the family’s mending, weaving her love in every stitch she sewed.

Those who knew her would unhesitatingly agree that Lois’ life centered on her family. She was a proud and devoted mother to her children whom she deeply loved and unfailingly supported. Her fun-loving nature made her a wonderful grandmother to her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Though the world is surely duller without Lois’ bright light, her vibrant legacy will continue to brilliantly shine in the hearts and lives of those she leaves behind.

Carrying Lois’ legacy forward in each of their days are her treasured children; Wayne (Rhonda) Loucks, Goshen and Gloria (Dan) King, Elkhart; her beautiful grandchildren, Carmen Snider, Nathan King, Amanda Evers, Adam Loucks, Natalie Cook; 9 delightful great-grandchildren; brothers, Lowell (Mildred) Truex, Nappanee, Don (Julia) Truex, New Paris; and sister, Joan (Don) Huml, New Haven. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband, sister, Bessie Henschen, and brother, Roy Truex Jr.

Family and friends may call from 4-8, Tuesday, February 7, 2017, and for 1 hour prior to the funeral service, Wednesday, February 8th at 10:30 am, all at Thompson-Lengacher & Yoder Funeral Home, Wakarusa. Pastor Jeremy Chesley will officiate and burial will be in Yellow Creek Mennonite Church Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be given to Bible Baptist Church.

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